Get the latest versions of Kobold2D from the download page and more details in the Release Notes.

Kobold2D v1.1.1 has been updated to include the latest version of cocos2d-iphone v1.1 (beta2b) from May 3rd this year. This version supports the -ipad and -ipadhd suffixes.

Both Kobold2D v1.1.1 and v2.0.1 have been updated to include the latest Chipmunk v6.1.1 and Chipmunk SpaceManager v0.1.3. Although unfortunately SpaceManager still isn’t fully compatible with cocos2d-iphone 2.0 because it still won’t rotate the sprites.

Again both versions include an important fix for KKInput: I’ve received several reports where users complained that KKInput is missing some events. Specifically the “ThisFrame” variants were prone to never fire. This is now fixed.

Line-Drawing Game Starterkit: ARC + cocos2d v1.1 & v2.0

While I’ve been meddling with Kobold2D updates I found this to be the perfect opportunity to update the Line-Drawing Game Starterkit as well. You now get four versions of the project, two are using cocos2d-iphone v1.1 and the other two have been updated to work with cocos2d-iphone v2.0.

And each of the two cocos2d-iphone version projects allows you to choose between the ARC enabled project or the classic manual reference counting project. The included readme document explains this in greater detail. Suffice it to say you can simply choose with which to start: cocos2d v1.1 or v2.0 and either with ARC enabled or manual reference counting.

Of course I strongly recommend the cocos2d-iphone v2.0 version with ARC enabled, seeing how the old devices have an ever diminishing, probably below 15% market share.

And do use ARC, it’s really a no-brainer not to bother with reference counting anymore.

If you’re an existing customer, you should have received an update email with your download link.

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This quick comparison sheet gives you all the info to decide whether to use Cocos2D 1.x or Cocos2D 2.x. Contrary to most programs, a higher version number doesn’t infer “better” or “more”. There are pros and cons for both versions.

At the time of this writing the decision really only boils down to whether you want to use shaders and whether you must be able to deploy your app to 1st & 2nd generation devices. See for yourself, it’s that simple:

Cocos2D v1.x

(+) compatible with all iOS devices
(+) compatible with all libraries
(-) no OpenGL ES 2.0 shader programs

Cocos2D v2.x

(+) OpenGL ES 2.0 shader programs
(-) incompatible with armv6 CPU devices:
iPhone, iPhone 3G, iPod Touch 1G & 2G
(-) incompatible with these libraries:
Cocos3D 0.x.x, Chipmunk SpaceManager 0.1.2

All other differences to this day are minor, and most new features and bugfixes have been migrated back and forth between versions. For beginners I strongly recommend using v1.x as there’s a lot more documentation available for this version. Those who have no interest in writing shader programs can also safely use the v1.x branch without missing out.

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Kobold2D Website now online!

On August 28, 2011, in cocos2d, Kobold2D, by Steffen Itterheim

The Kobold2D Website is now online. Go, have a look and let me know what you think.

Here are some pointers to get you started about Kobold2D (in case you haven’t heard) and the Kobold2D website:

 
Not sure what that means? In essence Kobold2D wants to make development with Cocos2D easier and more powerful for you. And in case you’re wondering: yes, Kobold2D is free and open source.
 
Some of the things you should know about Kobold2D:

The Ultimate Cocos2D Project: Libraries

On March 4, 2011, in cocos2d, Kobold2D, by Steffen Itterheim

The Ultimate Cocos2D Project is: Kobold2D!

Put simply: Kobold2D is designed to make Cocos2D developers more productive.

Original Post

Last week I wrote that I’m Building The Ultimate Cocos2D Xcode Project. In today’s weekly update I wanted to give you some more details on the use of libraries in that project.

Cocos3D included

So there happens to be a Cocos3D now. Rather than being part of the Cocos2D distribution, it’s an extension project. Guess what that means? Right, installing Cocos3D means fumbling with the dreaded install-templates.sh script (see this Cocos3D tutorial). Of course the first user reactions were: how do I install it? Installation failed, what am I doing wrong? And so on …

The Ultimate Cocos2D Project wouldn’t be ultimate if it didn’t include Cocos3D out of the box. And unmodified of course, as with all included libraries I want to make it as simple as possible to replace one library version with another. Once you get to half a dozen of included libraries, maintaining them all can become a hassle, so the very least I can do is to make it easy for everyone to upgrade specific libraries.

Obviously: Cocos2D included

Of course Cocos2D is also included as a static library as opposed to cluttering your project with all of its source files. Xcode project references make it very convenient to add external code and keeping it seperate. I’ve described the process in detail in my Cocos2D Xcode Project tutorial but since then I’ve learned a couple more things about how to make this even better.

For example, I no longer include cocos2d-iphone directly, instead there’s a seperate Xcode project in between so that I have full control over build settings (using XCConfig files) and make it possible to build both iOS and Mac OS targets in the same Xcode project. I will also include the current version of Cocos2D in the download because my goal is to make everything work out of the box.

No fumbling with install scripts, no additional downloads necessary, no need to modify any Xcode build settings – including developer certificates and header search paths. Build configurations for Ad Hoc and App Store release builds are also included, which will create .IPA and .ZIP files for you ready for Ad Hoc distribution respectively upload on iTunes Connect.

Popular libraries included

Now let’s get to the juicy part. Early on I realized that Cocos2D users often needed (or wanted) to include other libraries. Some of them have become so popular among the Cocos2D crowd that they could as well be part of the official distribution. Alas, they’re not. That’s a service I want to provide.

Often those libraries require special and non-obvious steps to successfully add them to an existing project. All too often those steps are either undocumented, untested, hard to follow, refer to outdated versions of Xcode, iOS SDK, etc. and generally require technical expertise of project configuration and compiler settings.

This is all taken care of for you. Here’s the list of libraries that are already included in the Ultimate Cocos2D Xcode Project:

That is quite a list. All you need to do to use these libraries is to either enable them in code or merely include the header file and start using them. If you worry that all these libraries will bloat your App, rest assured that Xcode is very clever: if you don’t actually make use of a static library (eg don’t include any of its header files), it will not be linked with your App and not waste any space or performance. I verified that.

Update policy

These are a lot of libraries to keep up to date. I plan to make about 4-8 point releases each year, usually triggered by a major (speak: non-beta) release of Cocos2D. If updating other libraries justifies an update depends on the library’s importance and the significance of the update.

Your libraries

Adding your own libraries to the project will be easy and the process will be documented. This will encourage code-sharing because your library will just work with other user’s project, it only needs to follow a few simple guidelines to become plugin-capable. This opens the door for better and tighter integration of 3rd party code into your projects. Even if you don’t intend to share your code, you’ll still benefit because your code will be easier to re-use and maintain.

Also, if you like you can make a request for a specific library or additional source code that should be included in the project, please leave a comment. I’ll see what I can do. :)

Chapter 12 – Physics Engines: Box2d & Chipmunk

This chapter gives you an introduction to physics engines and what they can do. Since cocos2d supports two physics engines out of the box, Box2d and Chipmunk, I will explain how to do the same things in both physics engines and I aim to cover at the very least the basic elements like shapes, joints and collisions.

Because choosing either physics engine is often done on subjectively. Some developers may prefer the Object-Oriented C++ nature of Box2d while others may feel more comfortable with the C-based interface of Chipmunk (*). At the very least I want to present both and show their strength and weaknesses by example.

(*) Note: there is an Objective-C binding for Chipmunk made by Howling Moon Software. It’s free to use on Mac OS X and iPhone Simulator but costs $200 per title if you want to publish to the App Store. I believe that most cocos2d developers wouldn’t mind spending up to $30 on a tool or library that is essential, that is why I included Zwoptex and Particle Designer in the book. This product however is in a different ballpark price-wise.

On the other hand, the free Chipmunk SpaceManager also aims to offer better integration with cocos2d-iphone and promises a simplified Objective-C interface. I will have a look at the SpaceManager and then decide whether I’ll discuss it in the book, I say it’s likely. Another physics tool that has gotten some attention is the VertexHelper which I’ll at the very least will refer to.

Summary of working on Chapter 11 – Isometric Tilemaps

Isometric tilemaps rock! That is, if you can get all those nasty issues solved. Even though all the issues like graphics glitches at tile edges, correct z-ordering and the proper blend functions have all been discussed and solved by now, it’s still very challenging to get an isometric tilemap on the screen and a player walking over it, with no glitches at all. I believe this chapter will give a lot more developers the chance to delve into the exciting world of isometric tilemaps. I too learned a lot making this example game, and part of me now wants to write an old-school isometric RPG game. Again. For the n-thousand-th time. Sigh. Some day, some day …

Anyhow, the project I made over the course of this chapter features properly z-ordered tiles and a player sprite, which moves tile-by-tile over the isometric tilemap. You control the player by simply touching in the direction relative to the player that he should move to. One specialty of this project is that the player always remains centered on the screen, he doesn’t move at all! It’s simply the tilemap that is moved under him, which makes a couple things much easier.

Nevertheless you also learn how to find the tile coordinates for a tile that you touch on the screen. And how to avoid the isometric, diamond-shaped tilemap to show the “outside” of the world by adding a border around the tilemap and limiting movement to the playable area. Similarly, the blocking tiles like walls, mountains and houses all block the player’s movement by drawing over the map with a collision layer and a tile whose property is set to “block_movement”.

In the meantime, if you want to gain a better understanding of how isometric tilemaps work, I can recommend the Isometric Projection article by Herbert Glarner. And in case you’re wondering how I suddenly and dramatically increased my art skills, I’ll be honest: I didn’t. I used the terrific tilesets from David E. Gervais which are published under the Creative Commons License. It means you are free to to copy, distribute and transmit those tiles as long as you credit David Gervais as their creator. You can download these tiles from Pousse Rapiere’s website or you can directly download them all at once as 6.4 MB ZIP file here. If you like to hear it from the man, here’s a bit of insight and history from David explaining how these tiles were made.

I made a few additions to the Xcode Tutorial and the cocos2d FAQ which are based on user questions and concerns.

Xcode Project Tutorial: How to integrate Chipmunk SpaceManager

How to update the cocos2d-iphone code in a project created with a cocos2d Project Template? (Theory & Advice)

How to fix common Box2d compile errors? (must compile using C++)

How to fix common Chipmunk compile errors? (does not compile with C++ code)

How to draw an endlessly repeating Parallax Background? (very simple, very effective)


On Searching the Tutorial & FAQs

I’m still trying to get the search function on the Tutorial and FAQ pages fixed. Currently it works for the Xcode Tutorial only but other search result links may simply show an Error. I’ll try to get this fixed as fast as i can and i’m getting very helpful support from the folks at ScreenSteps Live so i’m hopeful.

Please also note that the search box in the navigation panel doesn’t search the FAQ and Tutorials, just the blog and pages.

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