scr01There hasn’t been a new Cocos2D Podcast in over 4 months.

It was about time Mohammad Azam and I recorded another one.

This time our guest was Krzysztof Zabłocki, developer of the Foldify app and contributor to cocos2d-iphone.

Among other improvements Krzysztof added stencil buffering to CCRenderTexture.

Interviews with Mobile Game Engine Developers

The Mobile Game Engines eBook is now available!

One of the interviews is with me, about Kobold2D. KoboldTouch was at the time no more than an idea.

Jason Brownlee gave me permission to share the full interview with me (PDF, 18 pages). Go on, read it!

There are of course plenty more reknown game engine developer interviews in this book. Here’s the full list of interviewees:

Continue reading »

Cocos2D Podcast: Earn Additional Revenue

On June 21, 2011, in cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

The latest episode of the Cocos2D Podcast is out!

This time Azam and I talk about the options you have to earn additional revenue from or with your apps, using iAd ads, In-App Purchases, selling your source code and other ideas.

Cocos2D Podcast: Earning Additional Revenue

Cocos2D Podcast on iTunes

You might also want to read my blog post How to make over $18,000 in six months selling source code about the financial success of my Line-Drawing Starterkit. By the way, I’ll be releasing a new game kit in autumn. More details in the coming weeks.

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Cocos2D Podcast with Ray Wenderlich

On May 23, 2011, in cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

This episode of the Cocos2D Podcast with Mohammad Azam and myself has a very special guest: Ray Wenderlich.

Does he need any introduction? I guess not but on the off-chance that you’ve managed to have an interest in Cocos2D but haven’t heard of Ray’s Cocos2D tutorials, you should check them out.

Cocos2D Podcast with Ray Wenderlich

Cocos2D Podcast on iTunes

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Cocos2D Podcast with Andreas Löw

On May 19, 2011, in cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

In this episode of the Cocos2D Podcast Mohammad Azam and I talked with Andreas Löw, developer of TexturePacker & PhysicsEditor, about his products and the game that he is developing, among other things.

Cocos2D Podcast with Andreas Löw

Cocos2D Podcast on iTunes

Cocos2D Podcast #3: Tools for Cocos2D

On May 10, 2011, in cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

I almost forgot over the Zynga & Cocos2D news today that the next episode of the Cocos2D Podcast went live. It’s all about Cocos2D tools this time.

Cocos2D Podcast #3: Tools for Cocos2D

Cocos2D Podcast on iTunes

By the way, if I haven’t mentioned this in the Podcast I wanted to let you know that one of the new book chapters added to the second edition of my Cocos2D book will be introducing three of the new tools that came out after the first edition of Learn Cocos2D was written. Namely those will be TexturePacker, Glyph Designer and PhysicsEditor.

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Cocos2D Podcast #2: Alternative Engines

On April 25, 2011, in cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

The second Cocos2D Podcast with Mohammad Azam (@azamsharp) from HighOnCoding.com and me is now online at the Cocos2D Podcast website.

Listen to the Cocos2D Podcast #2

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Cocos2D Podcast Introduction online!

On April 4, 2011, in book, cocos2d, podcast, by Steffen Itterheim

The first Cocos2D Podcast with Mohammad Azam (@azamsharp) from HighOnCoding.com and me is now online. Refer to the Cocos2D Podcast website for show notes and web links.

Listen to the Cocos2D Podcast (36 minutes).

And here’s the iTunes link for the Cocos2D Podcast.

Addendums

… to be laid off is kind of cool.

No, that’s not a freudian slip but not the whole story either. 😀

As the layoffs hit EA Phenomic and it was disclosed to us that we’ll never be working on 3D games for PC and consoles anymore, and instead we’ll be focusing on making webgames, you’d be either in the position where you would have to be laid off (eg 3D Artists) – which admittedly wasn’t “cool”. But if you were in a position like me where you could expect to stay with the company, but you simply had no interest in making webgames, you could volunteer to be put on the layoff list. The “cool” thing about that is that you wouldn’t have to quit, which makes a big difference in terms of compensation and treatment you reveice from the company as well as getting state support for unemployment. And you could save someone else’s job who actually wanted to stay with the company. So that was just a nice way to handle an otherwise difficult situation.

Also, as far as I know almost everyone who was laid off quickly got a new job or started new careers as freelancers. Some even moved abroad to the UK and Canada to work for Ubisoft. Most went on to work for Crytek and Blue Byte. And even those who I expected were going to have a hard time getting a new job in the game industry, mostly due to lack of experience and achievements, found new employment in other game studios small and big. I find this noteworthy because whenever situations like EA Spouse, the Red Dead Redemption crunch or the layoffs and shutdowns in 2008/2009, there’s going to be a huge amount of worry expressed by employees that they don’t want to be fired because there’s no one else hiring. This couldn’t be further from the truth!

The game industry was and still is an industry where it is ridiculously easy to get a job – even with little qualification and experience – but at the same time notorious for those who “made it” to sustain the worst working conditions. This probably goes hand in hand. I know that those who landed their first game development job were very eager to keep it (me included), and they know or (even worse) suspect that there are likely better hires out there than oneself. Which in fact is sometimes reinforced by management, but my experiences trying to hire qualified staff tells a different story: it’s really, really hard to find qualified game developers which is why it’s so easy to get in because you often have no other choice but to hire from those who applied, not necessarily from those you wish would have applied. So game developers maybe trying to prove themselves harder and are more concerned about their job safety than they need to be.

Celsius / Fahrenheit

Turns out I wasn’t too far off with my guess: 25 ºC = 77 ºF

Not as hot as Texas of course, but relatively speaking a hot day for spring in germany.

Stressful

At one point I mentioned that the popularity I gained from writing the Learn Cocos2D book, plus the websites I run, can be “stressful”. I’m referring to the obligation and personal responsibility that I feel towards people seeking my help. One of the strongest negative feelings I have is looking at all those requests, knowing I can’t help all of them, and not knowing where to start answering. I don’t even have a good way to measure who needs my help the most.

Some of the questions are easy to answer, but that also means they are already answered if you go look around (google is your friend). Other questions are challenging, and I like that because they pick my brain, but answering those would require at least an hour or more of research and would seriously cut into the time I need for other tasks. And a third class of question is simply those I can’t answer, or at least not by email. That’s either because I lack the knowledge and experience on the subject matter (for example, I barely have any Cocoa Touch programming experience yet), or because it requires a fair amount of understanding of project-specific details, including design goals and the actual source code. Then there’s countless of job inquiries which as a professional I feel I should at least politely decline but even that is eating up quite a bit of time.

I feel a certain responsibility to answer everyone’s inquiries, be it about a specific programming problem or seeking someone to hire in order to get their game project done, which is why it’s so hard for me not to do it. And that in turn causes stress, or anxiety. But as I started receiving more and more of these requests I was lagging behind answering them, up to the point where I had to purposefully ignore most of the requests. I needed to face reality and cut down on the total time I spend communicating while still getting the essential tasks done (client work or the projects I set myself out to do). Though necessary to ignore most requests, to me it still doesn’t feel right, or fair, especially after I promised to be responsive. This is what creates the stress I was referring to. It’s something I have to come to terms with and I can only apologize for it.

I decided to alleviate that situation by monitoring all of these requests and figure out what the most pressing issues are, and then focus on fixing what I call the “big picture issues”, be it by programming or documenting. Kobold2D is one such effort to fix the ongoing issue of getting to work with Cocos2D (template installation, project configuration, setting up libraries). The Xcode 4 Template Documentation is my attempt to fix the information void about Xcode 4 templates, especially since every bit of information about Xcode 3 Templates is null and void due to the significant format changes.

Book Update

The contract is signed, this summer an updated version of the Learn Cocos2D book will be published. It will likely be titled “Learn iPhone 5 and iPad 2 Cocos2D Game Development” and change all the source code to be compatible with v1.0 of Cocos2D. There will also be two new chapters which will be revealed at a later time. And I’ll fix the erratas that have been reported thus far.

One of the things I want to fix is that working entirely from the book will not cause compile errors anymore, this specifically means adding some more source code to chapters 3 and 4 I believe, where I’ve omitted a few lines of code in the first edition. The Game Center chapter will be improved to include the data send/receive example. There will certainly be a couple more changes in regards to iOS 5 (if available at the time) and new devices like iPad 2 and iPhone 5 obviously, and miscellaneous changes here and there.

As usual I’ll keep you posted on the progress.

Xcode 4 Template Documentation & Cocos2D Podcast

On April 1, 2011, in cocos2d, Kobold2D, podcast, Xcode, by Steffen Itterheim

Xcode 4 Template Documentation


UPDATE:

You can get the Xcode 4 Template Documentation here!


The Xcode 4 Template Documentation has grown to nearly 40 pages (PDF) now, with only a few images and just reference material. The reference materials are nearly complete, including placeholders, variables and explanations for the use of every key available for Xcode 4 templates and a FAQ section. I still have to add the step-by-step tutorials (including example templates) for creating your own File Templates and Project Templates, and final proof reading and corrections.

Because the Xcode 4 Template Documentation has grown so big and I’ve already invested 50+ hours in it I want to try an experiment to see if creating documentation at this level of detail is sustainable. I’ll charge a small fee for access to the document, the standard price will be $15 and I’ll start selling it at an introductory price for a short period of time.

If this works out well in terms of revenue vs time investment I will likely offer more such in-depth documentation in the future. I was thinking that 50+ sales per month at $15 is a reasonable goal, and at this rate it would certainly be a welcome incentive for writing more documentation – next to me being generally inquisitive and interested in digesting challenging and diverse subjects.

I think the success of my book also ought to tell me that I can provide such in-depth treatments of game development topics. There’s certainly a lot of need for documentation on Cocos2D in general, but also there’s a big gap in general between what online documentation and tutorials offer (which often are only written for absolute beginners and/or to capture search engine traffic) versus the need of developers to learn more about a challenging niche subject in detail, including hard facts, recommendations, tips and tricks.

Cocos2D Podcast: coming soon …

Mohammad Azam aka @azamsharp recently approached me with the idea of creating a Cocos2D Podcast series. Azam has a lot of experience with creating podcasts and screencasts for the .NET crowd, and he has been a Cocos2D developer for about 6 months now with 4 kids apps already published to the App Store.

Two weeks ago we had a first dry run using Skype and liked the results, so we’re ready to record our first podcast this weekend if nothing gets in the way. I’m excited to try and see where we can take the Cocos2D Podcast and how you will like it.

The first podcast will be an introduction about ourselves and how we ended up working with Cocos2D, before we move on to trending topics in the Cocos2D space. If you have a suggestion for what we should discuss, or if you have a particular question that you like to get answered, please let me know (write a comment).

An apology

Lastly I wanted to apologize for missing last week’s update and not having much to report on this week. I was sick with a bad cold for the last ~10 days so nothing much happened in terms of Kobold2D or the Xcode 4 Template documentation. I’m still working on both of course.

I’m also responding to fewer and fewer emails, comments and forum posts as I’m getting swamped with them while spending a lot of time on other tasks. I realized I have to face the fact that as I gain popularity (much of it thanks to my book) I can no longer tend to everyone. Instead I’ll focus on listening in and providing value for a greater number of developers rather than responding to individual request. I’m sorry and I hope you understand.

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