Learn Cocos2D Book Source Code Update

On May 26, 2011, in book, cocos2d, by Steffen Itterheim

The most frequent questions I get from readers of my Learn Cocos2D book:

  • “Where can I download the source code?”
  • “Why do I get compile errors in CCLabel?”
  • “Is there an updated version of CCAnimationHelper?”

They all boil down to the fact that the book was written against cocos2d-iphone v0.99.5 with some projects using v0.99.4 and a few even had used v0.99.3.

Unfortunately this is also why some readers deducted one or more stars in their Amazon book reviews. Even more unfortunate because the changes that break the code were entirely cosmetic (renamed classes, function parameters removed or re-ordered, deprecated functions in favor of others). All changes required only fixing the lines using one of these outdated classes (CCLabel, CCLayerColor) or functions (bitmapFontAtlasWithString, frameWithTexture, …).

Quick List of Changes

I kept track of the changes I made to the source code. This is what it boils down to:

  • remove: EAGLView viewWith… -> remove last parameter: preserveBackBuffer:NO
  • remove: CCSpriteFrame: frameWithTexture -> remove last parameter: offset:CGPointZero
  • remove: CCAnimation: animationWithName -> animationWithFrames & remove last parameter: frames
  • rename: CCLabel -> CCLabelTTF
  • rename: CCBitmapFontAtlas -> CCLabelBMFont
  • rename: CCBitmapFontAtlas: bitmapFontAtlasWithString -> labelWithString
  • rename: CCXxxxxTransition -> CCTransitionXxxxx
  • rename: CCColorLayer -> CCLayerColor
  • rename: CCQuadParticleSystem -> CCParticleSystemQuad
  • rename: particle system: centerOfGravity -> sourcePosition
  • change: particle system: use NSUInteger instead of int for initWithParticleCount

These are the changes affecting the book’s source code. There were some more changes in the cocos2d-iphone engine, for example some actions have been renamed as well.

Good News: Updated Source Code for v1.0

I updated the book’s source code to use cocos2d-iphone v1.0.0 rc2. Once the v1.0 final is released I’ll make another update.

You can get the book’s source code from the Learn Cocos2D Book product page (scroll to the bottom), or via this direct download link. The download is about 100 MB and contains all the chapter’s source code plus some extra projects not mentioned in the book, and all of them (over 70!) are now using cocos2d-iphone v1.0.

Note: This code obviously differs slightly from the code described in the first edition of the Learn Cocos2D book, so you should get the unmodified v0.99.x book source code as well.

Upgrading to Cocos2D v1.0

I also recently wrote a tutorial outlining the steps to update an existing cocos2d-iphone v0.99.x project to v1.0 in case you have an existing project that you’d like to upgrade to the latest Cocos2D version.

Learn Cocos2D: Second Edition

All these changes will be reflected in the second edition of the Learn Cocos2D book.

The second edition will be released summer 2011, likely around July to August. This is my estimate based on the fact that my work is scheduled to be completed on June 27th, and I’m working hard to keep that (tight) schedule.

Actually, make that we are working hard. The second edition of the Learn Cocos2D book will have contributions from a co-author. Someone who is well-known in the Cocos2D community! To be unveiled. :)

Updating Cocos2D in an Existing Project

On May 20, 2011, in cocos2d, support, Xcode, by Steffen Itterheim

Upgrading cocos2d-iphone is a recurring issue for many developers but since it happens so infrequently during the lifecycle of a project, there’s just no routine to follow. Eventually you might want to upgrade cocos2d-iphone, so the question arises: how do you do that with the least amount of trouble?

As I’m going through the process of updating over 70 (!) Xcode projects for the second revision of my Learn Cocos2D book, I thought I should outline the steps to upgrade an existing Xcode 3 project which uses cocos2d-iphone v0.99.x to a Xcode 4 project that uses cocos2d-iphone v1.0.x.

Prerequisites: software update

Obviously, you want to download the latest cocos2d-iphone version and unzip it to any directory. Just remember where you unzipped it because that’s where you’ll copy the new library folders from.

You also want to make sure you’ve upgraded to Xcode 4 by now, by installing the iOS 4.3 (or later) SDK, if you haven’t done so already.

Caution: Make sure Xcode is closed during the first steps.

Step #1: delete libs folder contents

In your project’s folder, in this case DoodleDrop03, select all folders in the libs folder and delete them without mercy:

You’ll end up with an empty libs folder. In other words, don’t delete the libs folder itself or in case you did, make sure you re-create the libs folder.

Caution: The reason why I delete all the libraries in the libs folder instead of simply overwriting the libraries with new ones is simple: you can expect the updated cocos2d-iphone version to have removed or renamed some files. By first deleting all libraries you can be sure that no “zombie files” exist which are no longer used but might still be compiled when you later re-add the libraries. Such zombie files would screw up the build process and generate errors like “Duplicate defined symbols” and other such mishaps.

Step #2: copy the library folders

The first thing you’ll notice when you want to upgrade the libs (Box2D, Chipmunk, cocos2d, CocosDenshion, cocoslive, FontLabel and TouchJSON) is that they’re in different folders in the cocos2d-iphone project that you’ve downloaded and unzipped.

Make sure you select the exact same folders that are selected in the screenshot below:

This difference in folder layout can be a bit confusing. What you need to be aware of is that the Box2D, Chipmunk, FontLabel and TouchJSON folders are in the external folder in the cocos2d-iphone project. Furthermore, the Box2D folder that you should copy is a subfolder of Box2d. Note the difference in capitalization of the letter D. You want to copy the folder with the uppercase D: Box2D. The same goes for the CocosDenshion folder, you should select the CocosDenshion folder inside the CocosDenshion folder.

Caution: Make sure you don’t select the Box2D Testbed folder – if you do and copy that as well, Xcode 4 might lock up building the project, consuming 100% CPU power and requiring a force quit to shut it down.

Note: If you use only Chipmunk or Box2D physics, or neither of them, you can skip copying these folders of course.

To complete the copy opertation, go to the libs folder and paste the copied library folders so that you end up with a libs folder that looks exactly like the image in Step #1.

Tip: If you prefer drag and drop you can just drag the selected folders from one Finder window to another onto your project’s libs folder. This may be easier to do but you should remember to hold down the Option key while dropping so that you actually copy the folders instead of moving them. The copy operation is indicated by the green + icon underneath the cursor as you drag & drop while holding the Option key.

Step #3: Remove Library References

Open your project in Xcode 4 now.

Select all groups under the cocos2d Sources group and hit Backspace to delete these groups (or right-click and choose Delete). You will be prompted with a dialog like in the screenshot below.

Make sure you select the default option Remove References Only to avoid deleting the new library folders you just copied:

Once you’ve removed the libraries groups, the cocos2d Sources group should be completely empty. You just got rid of all the old references, saving yourself from any potential compilation errors caused by references to files which may not exist anymore.

Step #4: Add Library Folders

Next you want to re-add your library folders. Select and right click the cocos2d Sources group and select Add Files to “NameOfYourProject”…:

Browse into the project’s libs folder and select all the library folders that you need in your project.

You may have noticed that my project doesn’t use any physics engine, so I decided to not add them here. If you do use Box2D in your project you would want to also select Box2D of course. Likewise if you use Chipmunk.

Note: While it’s not a problem to add both physics engine folders, doing so might increase your App’s size.

Now, here’s where you need to be careful with the options! You want to make sure they’re set exactly as in the screenshot below. Most importantly, when adding files Xcode will default to add the files to the project’s main target (in this case DoodleDrop) instead of the cocos2d libraries target.

Make sure that only the cocos2d libraries target is selected to avoid any build errors:

Step #5: Build it!

You should now try and build the project. If you’re lucky, there won’t be any errors and you can continue with your work.

But most likely, depending on your project’s complexity and the changes made to cocos2d-iphone, you may have to fix any build errors that occur. Most of them are likely to be caused by classes that have been renamed or functions that have been deprecated. In this case you’ll have to find out through the API Reference and release notes what the changes are and how to fix them.

Fixing the “missing base SDK” message

One common issue that occurs specifically to older projects is the “missing base SDK” error. I think it was the Xcode version introduced with Mac OS X Snow Leopard (released Aug. 28th 2010) that eventually fixed this dreaded issue by adding a “latest iOS” option for the Base SDK Build Setting.

If you see a message like this (especially if it gives you a compile warning or error):

You should change the Base SDK Build Setting of your project to use the “Latest iOS” setting:

Note: In some cases it may be necessary to close Xcode 4 and re-open it to make the “missing base SDK” message go away.

Correctly Inheriting Build Settings

Normally, all targets in Xcode inherit the Build Settings of the project by default.

However, once you’ve made any change to any Build Setting at the target level this Build Setting will no longer inherit changes made to the same Build Setting on the project level. The default reaction by many developers is often to bite the bullet and check and re-check the Build Settings of the project as well as all targets, and to make the same change as many times as you have targets in your project.

Don’t do that, there’s a better and easier way!

You can have a Build Setting at the target level to default back to inherit the Build Setting defined at the project level. Likewise a Build Setting at the project level can be set to inherit from the OS default setting. In the screenshot below I have purposefully changed the Build Setting at the target level:

To have it default back to the project setting, which is Latest iOS (iOS 4.3) all you need to do is to select that Build Setting and hit the Delete key:

Tip: Switching from the Combined to the Levels view when reviewing the Build Settings makes it easy to see which Build Settings are inherited and which aren’t. You’ll also notice that any Build Setting that has been changed at the current level and doesn’t inherit its value anymore is printed in bold letters.

That’s it!

Happy coding with your newly updated cocos2d-iphone project! This upgrade tutorial will also be printed in the second revision of the Learn Cocos2D book.

Tip: With Kobold2D it will be even easier to upgrade your project because a simple copy & paste of the files in the kobold2d folder will suffice. If there are ever any additional steps to follow we’ll describe them in detail of course.

Tagged with:  

The Ultimate Cocos2D Project: Startup

On March 12, 2011, in Kobold2D, by Steffen Itterheim

The Ultimate Cocos2D Project is: Kobold2D!

Put simply: Kobold2D is designed to make Cocos2D developers more productive.

Original Post

Time for a weekly update. This time about startup code and configuration. One of the things that I frequently encountered following the development of Cocos2D and working with it, is how any change to the startup code – the main function, the App delegate and the root ViewController – caused issues and headscratching among developers.

I decided it doesn’t need to be this way.

The main() function

A code snippets speaks more than words:

[cc lang=”ObjC”]
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
return KKMain(argc, argv, NULL);
}
[/cc]

That’s right, all of the startup code is now part of the project’s source code. You can still do whatever you need to do before and after the call to KKMain (probably nothing, except maybe anti-piracy code). And the third parameter (NULL) to KKMain is reserved for future use, to pass in any configuration parameters if the need arises.

Let’s see what KKMain does:

[cc lang=”ObjC” height=”650″]
int KKMain(int argc, char* argv[], SMainParameters* userParameters)
{
SMainParameters parameters;
initMainParameters(&parameters, userParameters);

#ifdef __IPHONE_OS_VERSION_MAX_ALLOWED
NSAutoreleasePool* pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
#else
// Mac OS X specific startup code
[MacGLView load_];
#endif

// This makes the CCDirector class known to wax:
[CCDirector class];
// wax setup is sufficient for all intents and purposes
wax_setup();

[KKLua doString:kLuaInitScript];
[KKLua doString:kLuaInitScriptPlatformSpecific];
[KKLua doString:kLuaInitScriptForWax];

// This loads the config.lua file
[KKConfig loadConfigLua];

// run the app with the provided general-purpose AppDelegate which handles a lot of tedious stuff for you
#ifdef __IPHONE_OS_VERSION_MAX_ALLOWED
int retVal = UIApplicationMain(argc, argv, nil, parameters.appDelegateClassName);
[pool release];
#else
int retVal = NSApplicationMain(argc, (const char**)argv);
#endif

return retVal;
}
[/cc]

The usual, really, except that it also initializes Wax and thus Lua for your App as well as providing the necessary startup code for both supported platforms: iOS and Mac OS X. The KKLua class is an Objective-C wrapper around the most imortant Lua functions, most notably it has the doString and doFile methods which allow you to run any Lua code or file containing Lua code.

KKConfig is a class that loads a Lua table and stores it in a NSDictionary for fast access to Lua parameters at runtime. I’ll discuss it in detail another time. The main purpose of KKConfig is to loadConfigLua, which loads the config.lua script returning a table containing startup parameters and making those parameters available to Objective-C.

Config.lua in detail

Let’s have a quick look at an excerpt of the config.lua file. It contains all of the startup parameters a developer using Cocos2D would ever want to tweak in a conveniently editable Lua script:

[cc lang=”Lua” height=”400″]
local config =
{
KKStartupConfig =
{
— load first scene from a class with this name, or from a Lua script with this name with .lua appended
FirstSceneClassName = “GameScene”,

— set the director type, and the fallback in case the first isn’t available
DirectorType = DirectorType.DisplayLink,
DirectorTypeFallback = DirectorType.NSTimer,

MaxFrameRate = 60,
DisplayFPS = YES,
DisplayFPSInAdHocBuilds = NO,

— Render settings
DefaultTexturePixelFormat = TexturePixelFormat.RGB565,
GLViewColorFormat = GLViewColorFormat.RGB565,
GLViewDepthFormat = GLViewDepthFormat.DepthNone,
GLViewPreserveBackBuffer = NO,
GLViewMultiSampling = NO,
GLViewNumberOfSamples = 0,

Enable2DProjection = NO,
EnableRetinaDisplaySupport = YES,

— … and many more settings!
},
}

return config
[/cc]

Since you don’t want to guess what those settings mean, I’ve documented them for you:

Config.lua Parameter Documentation (PDF)

This should also illustrate the kind of documentation I’m striving for. Documentation will be available online. It’s created in a Confluence Wiki with the help of ScreenSteps for more visual, step-by-step documentation.

App Delegate & Root ViewController

You may be wondering how you can modify and tweak the App Delegate and Root ViewController if they’re both part of the distribution, rather than copied into each project? That’s actually very simple: both are regular Objective-C classes, so they can be subclassed and methods overridden as needed.

Both KKAppDelegate and KKRootViewController provide a default implementation which you can tweak with the config.lua parameters. If that shouldn’t be enough, for example if you have to plug in some 3rd party code into the App Delegate, each project will have a subclass of KKAppDelegate and KKRootViewController in which you can override any of the UIApplicationDelegate and UIViewController protocol methods. Usually you would first call the super implementation, unless you want to entirely replace the default behavior.

The KKAppDelegate method calls one specific method called initializationComplete at the end of the delegate method applicationDidFinishLaunching. This allows you to run any custom code right before the first scene is shown. You can use that to call the CCDirector runWithScene method manually, in case you have more than one scene which might be run as first scene depending on certain conditions.

If you set the FirstSceneClassName config.lua setting, the project will first check if there’s a classname.lua file. If so, it will run this Lua script, assuming it contains the implementation of the first scene (more on that some other time). Otherwise it checks if there’s an existing Objective-C class derived from CCScene with that name, and if so allocates and initializes this scene and calls runWithScene for you.

In essence

From your point of view, the execution of the App now starts with the first scene, before that there’s no code that you’ll have to concern yourself with. Any startup configuration tweaks that you need to do can be done comfortably via the config.lua file, and the only setting you’ll need to change is the name of the first scene’s class name or Lua script. In addition you’ll get access to some features out of the box, for example adding iAd banners is now a simple on/off switch.

Moreover, any time there’s a change in Cocos2D’s startup code, or the startup code in any other library (most notably Wax), I can just make those changes for you and release a new version. This isn’t something you need to concern yourself with anymore, and makes upgrading existing projects to new versions of Cocos2D and other libraries even easier.

Scheduling multiple update selectors

On March 2, 2011, in cocos2d, Programming, by Steffen Itterheim

I have a seemingly simple requirement for my project: each node should have preUpdate and postUpdate methods in addition to the regular update method. Preprocessing and postprocessing before and after all entities have run their “update” logic is a common requirement in game development. Sometimes called the setup stage before processing all entities in the world, and the finalize stage to complete the current game step and possibly resolve collisions or check any win, lose or achievements conditions.

Of course there are alternative and some may argue “better” implementations, after all an experienced game dev might argue that using pre and post update methods are merely signs of a badly designed game update loop (the jury is out on that one). However beginning game developers definitely understand this concept much better and every game-making tool I know implements pre and post updates, so it has its validity. Plus I find it more convenient than “outsourcing” some logic to a central game loop.

On the other hand it’s also bad practice to rely on one node’s update method to be called before or after all others. Especially once you get to prioritizing update method calls among various groups of nodes it’s just going to get you into trouble. If you set the priority wrong just once you can introduce very subtle issues that’ll be hard to track down. Think of some objects not colliding with the player, or some monsters crashing when you shoot at them with a specific weapon. Scheduled methods should never rely on the order they are called for various entities.

Not so easy …

It turns out the system in Cocos2D only allows one update method per node. That means for each node you can only have one update selector, and via the priority parameter you can only control when its update method is called relative to all other nodes’ update method. In that way you can at least ensure that the player’s update method is always called first, or last, depending on your requirements. But it’s bad programming practice to do so.

I thought, why not just schedule a “regular” selector with CCScheduler? Well, they don’t have a priority, and they are always called after any update method, so you could never schedule a “before update” method this way. And those scheduled selectors aren’t meant to be used for selectors that are called every frame due to the additional processing overhead (eg allocating, updating and releasing the CCTimer object, and comparing & updating time elapsed every frame).

So I had to write a class called ScheduleMultiUpdate which creates proxy instances, registers them with CCScheduler to receive an update message of their own, and then they forward that message to the actual node implementing the special update selector. By using the priority you can define if the selector is called before or after the regular update by using a negative (before) respectively a positive priority (after, must be 1 or greater).

Example Code

Here’s an example usage scheduling the beforeUpdate and afterUpdate selectors to be called before and after the regular update method.

[cc lang=”ObjC” height=”550″]
// in interface (.h)
KKScheduleMultiUpdate* multiUpdate;

// in implementation (.m)
-(void) scheduleUpdateMethods
{
multiUpdate = [[KKScheduleMultiUpdate alloc] initWithNode:self];
[multiUpdate scheduleUpdateSelector:@selector(beforeUpdate:) priority:-1];
[self scheduleUpdateWithPriority:priority];
[multiUpdate scheduleUpdateSelector:@selector(afterUpdate:) priority:1];
}

// this has to be cleanup because CCScheduler retains scheduled targets
// we have to give KKScheduleMultiUpdate a chance to unschedule its selectors or it won’t be deallocated
-(void) cleanup
{
[multiUpdate release];
multiUpdate = nil;
[super cleanup];
}

-(void) beforeUpdate:(ccTime)delta
{
}
-(void) update:(ccTime)delta
{
}
-(void) afterUpdate:(ccTime)delta
{
}
[/cc]

Here’s the actual implementation of KKScheduleMultiUpdate and its proxy class. Notice how the KKScheduleMultiUpdate simply retains a list of proxies and creates new ones, while the proxy class registers itself with CCScheduler to schedule its own update method based on the given priority, and then forwards the message to the baseNode. There’s currently no way to unschedule an update selector, but it should be fairly easy to add if you ever need to unschedule an update method while the game is running (I’d rather just use a bool and skip update).

@interface

[cc lang=”ObjC” height=”500″]
#import “cocos2d.h”

/** Allows you to schedule multiple update methods per node. */
@interface KKScheduleMultiUpdate : NSObject
{
CCNode* baseNode;
CCArray* updateProxies;
}

-(id) initWithNode:(CCNode*)node;
-(void) scheduleUpdateSelector:(SEL)selector priority:(int)priority;

@end

/** Since there can be only one update selector scheduled per instance, this proxy will implement
that update method and forward the message to the desired selector. */
@interface KKScheduleMultiUpdateProxy : NSObject
{
id target;
SEL selector;
TICK_IMP impMethod;
}

-(id) initWithTarget:(id)target selector:(SEL)selector priority:(int)priority;

@end
[/cc]

@implementation

[cc lang=”ObjC” height=”500″]
#import “KKScheduleMultiUpdate.h”

@implementation KKScheduleMultiUpdate

-(id) initWithNode:(CCNode*)node
{
if ((self = [super init]))
{
NSAssert(node != nil, @”%@ %@ – node is nil!”, NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd));
baseNode = [node retain];

updateProxies = [[CCArray alloc] initWithCapacity:1];
}
return self;
}

-(void) dealloc
{
CCLOG(@”%@ %@”, NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);

[baseNode release];
baseNode = nil;

// must do a cleanup to unschedule CCSelector, this is because CCScheduler retains scheduled targets
[updateProxies makeObjectsPerformSelector:@selector(cleanup)];
[updateProxies release];
updateProxies = nil;

NSAssert([self retainCount] == 1, @”%@ %@ – retainCount on cleanup should be 1 but is %i”, NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), [self retainCount]);

[super dealloc];
}

-(void) scheduleUpdateSelector:(SEL)selector priority:(int)priority
{
NSAssert([baseNode respondsToSelector:selector], @”%@ %@ – node %@ does not respond to selector”, NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), baseNode);
// TODO: might want to check here if the selector happens to be already scheduled

KKScheduleMultiUpdateProxy* proxy = [[KKScheduleMultiUpdateProxy alloc] initWithTarget:baseNode selector:selector priority:priority];
[updateProxies addObject:proxy];
[proxy release];
}

@end

@implementation KKScheduleMultiUpdateProxy

-(id) initWithTarget:(id)target_ selector:(SEL)selector_ priority:(int)priority
{
if ((self = [super init]))
{
NSAssert(target_ != nil, @”target is nil”);
NSAssert(selector_ != nil, @”selector is nil”);

target = target_; // weak ref
selector = selector_; // weak ref

impMethod = (TICK_IMP)[target methodForSelector:selector];
NSAssert(impMethod != nil, @”selector is not an instance method of target %@”, target);

[[CCScheduler sharedScheduler] scheduleUpdateForTarget:self priority:priority paused:NO];
}
return self;
}

-(void) cleanup
{
CCLOG(@”%@ %@”, NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);

[[CCScheduler sharedScheduler] unscheduleUpdateForTarget:self];
impMethod = nil;

NSAssert([self retainCount] == 1, @”%@ %@ – retainCount after cleanup should be 1 but is %i”, NSStringFromClass([self class]), NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), [self retainCount]);
}

-(void) dealloc
{
CCLOG(@”%@ %@”, NSStringFromSelector(_cmd), self);

[super dealloc];
}

-(void) update:(ccTime)delta
{
impMethod(target, selector, delta);
}

@end
[/cc]

As always, you’re free to use this code. I release it under the MIT License. You do not need to include a copyright notice, but I’d appreciate any mention or backlink to this website.

I almost forgot about the Cocos2D-Project on github. While it works flawlessly with the latest v0.99.5 stable release of Cocos2D, it was still bundled with only the RC1 (release candidate). So I’ve updated the cocos2d version in the repository.

In case you don’t know what Cocos2D-Project is:

Cocos2D-Project is a great way to start any Cocos2D-iPhone based project.

It eases up- and downgrading the Cocos2D game engine at any time. It includes additional source code as well as multiple targets and build configurations for Ad Hoc & App Store distribution (creates the necessary IPA/ZIP files) and debugging of memory leaks and related issues.

Cocos2D-Project is free, open-source, uses the MIT License and comes already bundled with the cocos2d-iphone version that it currently works with “out of the box”.

It’s not affiliated with or endorsed by cocos2d-iphone.org and Ricardo Quesada. You will get support for Cocos2D-Project on Cocos2D Central.

Future updates

With the help of others, the Cocos2D-Project development has taken on a life of its own. The current work in progress is much more than a simple Xcode project referencing just the Cocos2D game engine. I’m looking forward to announce a big update in a couple weeks. Stay tuned.

Tagged with:  

Xcode Project for Cocos2D v0.99.5 beta 3

On October 20, 2010, in Announcements, cocos2d, support, Xcode, by Steffen Itterheim

Due to a number of breaking changes in the recent Cocos2D beta versions, including the rename of the Cocos2D project to cocos2d-ios.xcodeproj, I’ve made an update to my Xcode project. You know, the one from this tutorial that allows you to keep Cocos2D completely seperate from your own code, which in turn enables you to easily and safely up- and downgrade Cocos2D by merely replacing the Cocos2D folder.

So now it also works with Cocos2D and here is the download:

Download the Xcode Project (Cocos2D v0.99.5 beta 3 and later)

What you have to do to upgrade the project, in case you already started a project with my older Xcode template but would like to upgrade to Cocos2D v0.99.5 beta 3:

  • remove the cocos2d-iphone project from your Xcode project
  • follow these instructions from Select the Project itself up to and including Drag & Drop Libraries to Target
  • (don’t forget to repeat the instructions for all targets you’re using, not just the current one)
  • clean all targets and build

Note: depending on the iOS SDK version you’re on, you may have to Get Info on the Xcode project as well as the cocos2d-ios project and on the General tab set the Base SDK to iOS 4.x, then close and re-open the project (Xcode should update the SDK version immediately but sometimes it doesn’t).

If you plan to use Cocos2D v0.99.4 then the Xcode project supporting this Cocos2D version is still available here.

Tagged with:  
Page 3 of 3123